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Matthew Leo Knope

Title:Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
Primary Affiliation:Department of Geological & Environmental Sciences
Office Location:Mitchell B07
Research Group:Paleobiology lab
Alternative Website:Matthew Knope's Website
E-mail:knope@stanford.edu

Research

A great deal of the spectacular diversity of life on Earth is thought to emerge through adaptive radiation, the often rapid diversification of species in a single biological lineage to fill a wide-variety of ecological niches. Celebrated examples include the “Cambrian Explosion” of early animals, the diversification of Anolis lizards on the Caribbean Islands and Darwin’s finches in the Galapagos. My research focuses on taxonomically widely divergent systems (microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fishes) and takes an interdisciplinary approach to elucidating the patterns, rate, timing, and drivers of ecological diversification during adaptive radiation in both the recent and the ancient past. By utilizing field surveys, laboratory and field experiments, molecular phylogenetics, and comparative modeling methods, I address questions of how and why species multiply.

Teaching

I have taught the Introduction to Ecology course, the Ecology, Evolution, and Plant Biology Laboratory course, and Teaching of Biology at Stanford. I have also taught the Biology of Fishes course at the University of Oregon and the Principles of Ecology course at San Francisco State University.

Education

    Ph.D. Stanford University, Biology 2012 Ecology, Evolution and Population Biology

    Ph.D. Candidate, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Zoology 2006-2008 

    M.A. San Francisco State University, Biology 2004 

    B.A. University of California at Santa Cruz, Marine Biology (Honors) 1999

     

Professional Experience

    Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Stanford University, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Paleobiology laboratory

    HHMI Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow, Stanford University, Biology 2012

Honors & Awards

    Stanford University, Norman K. Wessells Teaching Award, 2011

    Stanford University, Dept. of Biology Teaching Excellence Award, 2011

    National Science Foundation GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Award 2006-2008

    Santa Cruz County Science Fair Teacher of the Year, 2005

    SF State Nelson Fellowship Award for Academic Excellence in Graduate Studies, 2002

    SF State Graduate Fellowship Award for Teaching Excellence, 2001

    University of California, Santa Cruz Thesis Honors, 1998

     

University Service

    Stanford University Biology Undergraduate Studies Committee (2011-2012)

    Stanford University Eco-Evo Reading Group Coordinator (2009-2011)

    Stanford University, RISE High School Mentorship Program Summer 2010

    Stanford University, Undergraduate Mentor Winter 2010

     

Professional Activities

    Review activities: Biology Letters, Ecology, Hydrobiologia, International Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Ecology, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Springer Life Sciences Publishing Group, and Theoretical Population Biology


    Editorial review board member: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution

     

    Professional Societies: Society for the Study of Evolution, Society of Systematic Biologists, American Society of Naturalists, Western Society of Naturalists, Botanical Society of America

     

Courses Taught

    I have taught the Introduction to Ecology course, the Ecology, Evolution, and Plant Biology Laboratory course, and the Teaching of Biology at Stanford. I have also taught the Biology of Fishes course at the University of Oregon and the Principles of Ecology course at San Francisco State University.

Publications

    Payne JL, NA Heim, ML Knope and CR McClain. (in press). Metabolic dominance of bivalves predates brachiopod diversity decline by more than 150 million years. Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences

     

    Knope ML and RJ Larson. (in press). Autotomy in porcelain crabs is an effective escape mechanism from rockfish predation. Marine Ecology

     

    Knope ML, Pender R, Crawford DJ, and AM Wieczorek. (2013). Invasive congeners are unlikely to hybridize with native Hawaiian Bidens (Asteraceae). American Journal of Botany 100(6): 1-6

     

    Knope ML and JA Scales (2013). Adaptive morphological shifts to novel habitats in marine sculpin fishes. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 26(3): 472-482

     

    Knope ML (2013). Phylogenetics of marine sculpins (Teleostei: Cottidae) of the North American Pacific Coast. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 341-349

     

    Knope ML, Morden CW, Funk VA, and Fukami T (2012). Area and the rapid radiation of Hawaiian Bidens (Asteraceae). Journal of Biogeography 39(7): 1206-1216

     

    Knope ML, Forde SE and Fukami T (2012). Evolutionary history, immigration history, and the extent of diversification in community assembly. Frontiers in Microbiology 2:273

     

    Spalding HL, Gupta A, Barshis DJ, Knope ML, Tice KA, Dirzo R, and C Wilbur. (2010). K-12 science education and “broader impacts”. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(4): 217-218

     

    Baumgartner E, Zabin CJ, Philippoff JK, Cox E, and ML Knope. (2009). Ecological monitoring provides a thematic foundation for student inquiry. pp. 191-209. In Yager, R. (Ed). Inquiry: The Key to Exemplary Science. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association.

     

    Ramon ML and ML Knope (2008). Molecular support for marine sculpin (Cottidae; Oligocottinae) diversification during the transition from the subtidal to intertidal habitat in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 46: 475-483

     

    Wasson K, BE Lyon, and ML Knope (2002). Hair-Trigger autotomy in porcelain crabs (Petrolisthes spp.) is a highly effective escape strategy. Behavioral Ecology 13: 481-486

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