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Outcrop Analogs of Subsurface Deep-water Systems

Much of SPODDS research involves studies of outcropping deep-water systems to develop a better understanding of the processes of sedimentation and the architecture of the resulting deposits.
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Outcrop Analogs

Seismic Studies

SPODDS scientists use 3D and 2D seismic data to investigate the geometry and evolution of ancient deep-water systems at the intermediate to large scale.
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Seismic Studies

Shale Geochemistry

SPODDS researchers use a combined sedimentological and geochemical approach to understand fine-grained sedimentary rocks.
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Modern Seafloor Depositional Systems

Many SPODDS studies have focused on modern sea-floor depositional systems, including submarine canyons in the South China Sea and off west Africa and canyon and fan activity in the Continental Borderland of southern California.
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Modern Seafloor Depositional Systems

Source-to-Sink Studies of Deep-water Systems

Many past and ongoing projects integrate petrographic, geochemical, and detrital geochronology datasets to understand provenance and sediment routing during the evolution of deep-water sedimentary basins.
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Outcrop Analogs of Subsurface Deep-water Systems
Seismic Studies
Shale Geochemistry
Modern Seafloor Depositional Systems
Source-to-Sink Studies of Deep-water Systems

About SPODDS

The Stanford Project on Deep-water Depositional Systems (SPODDS) is a research program in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth Sciences. We focus on the ancient and modern deep-water deposits around the world, providing opportunities for students, faculty, and participating companies to collaborate via guided research and exploration.  Our scientific community includes a wide-range of internationally-based affiliate companies and research institutions. In this era of ever dwindling natural resources, we seek greater understanding of deep-water deposits as reservoirs for energy products on the ancient sea floor and modern continental margins. A huge highlight of the program is the annual field trip to one of the world's classic deep-water basins.

News

Congratulations to Dr. Zach Sickmann for successfully defending his PhD!

Zach's research was focused on understanding the tectonic and sedimentological controls on provenance signatures within modern and ancient sediments. The title of his dissertation is "Understanding provenance signatures in active margin settings: Modern central California and the Magallanes-Austral Foreland Basin, southern Patagonia." Congratulations and good luck, Zach!

SPODDS welcomes Professors Erik Sperling and Matthew Malkowski!

SPODDS welcomes Prof. Erik Sperling and Prof. Matthew Malkowski to the program as part of our continued mission to scientifically explore the full spectrum of modern and ancient deep-water depositional systems across all scales and grain sizes.

Recent Publications

Kremer, C.H., McHargue, T., Scheucher, L., & Graham, S.A. (2018). Transversely-sourced mass-transport deposits and stratigraphic evolution of a foreland submarine channel system: Deep-water tertiary strata of the Austrian Molasse Basin. Marine and Petroleum Geology. Article link

Lowe, D.R., Graham, S.A., Malkowski, M.A., & Das, B, in-review, The role of avulsion and splay development in deep-water channel systems: sedimentology, architecture, and evolution of the deep-water Pliocene Godavari channel complex, India, submitted to Marine and Petroleum Geology.

Malkowski, M.A., Jobe, Z.R., Sharman, G.R., & Graham, S.A. (2018). Down-slope facies variability within deep-water channel systems: Insights from the Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation, southern Patagonia. Sedimentology. Article link