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Weather underground

Stanford Earth alumni Katie Keranen and Justin Rubinstein are at the forefront of investigations of induced earthquakes in Oklahoma.

'New normal’: Scientists predict less rain from here on out

Recent studies by Noah Diffenbaugh and Daniel Swain have linked California's current dry conditions to climate change, and suggest droughts will be much more common in the future. 

SESI plant

New Stanford energy system will dramatically reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions

An innovative new approach to meeting its energy needs will make Stanford one of the world's most energy-efficient universities.

Improving environmental decision-making processes

Despite collaboration’s widespread use in environmental decision-making, there had been little evidence that it actually improves the resources being managed.  Recent research indicates there is a positive impact. 


Frank Gehrke, Jerry Brown and Mark Cowin at press conference

Record-low snowpack: Bad news for California, say Stanford experts

The snowpack in California's mountains is at the lowest level ever recorded. The long-term effects of the drought could be devastating.

NSF CAREER award for Tiziana Vanorio

Vanorio's grant will allow her to advance her studies on the rock physics signatures of fluid-rock interactions, which are vital components in understanding the properties of volcanic rocks and concrete, pursuing carbon sequestration projects, and studying induced seismicity.

Oil drums

Know your oil

Prof. Adam Brandt is co-author of the Global Oil-Climate Index that allows comparison of climate impacts associated with a broad range of oil resources such as heavy oils, oil sands and tight oil.  Brandt collaborated with colleagues from the Carnegie Endowment's Energy and Climate Program and the University of Calgary to develop the first-of-its-kind index.

Solar could meet California energy demand three to five times over

Research by Chris Field finds that the amount of energy that could be generated from solar equipment constructed on and around existing infrastructure in California would exceed the state’s demand by up to five times.

Hand next to an ugly carrot

Tons of 'ugly' fruits and veggies thrown away

The million tons of fruits and vegetables that are tossed out globally each year because they don't meet cosmetic standards or conform to conventional shapes is a tremendous waste of resources, writes PhD student Anna Lee. 

For carbon dioxide emissions, a backup plan to business as usual

With global carbon dioxide levels recently exceeding 400 parts per million and global carbon emissions projected to continue rising for the next several decades, the National Research Council commissioned a two-part report to learn more about potential interventions.

Leading journal honors faculty research

A study of urban water supply vulnerability coauthored by Steven Gorelick was recognized as the "Best Paper of 2014" by Environmental Research Letters. The  journal also honored "ground breaking" research on global crop yields coauthored by David Lobell, and on urban agriculture coauthored by Eric Lambin.

Contestants at table

Oceans of questions, and answers

Stanford was swimming with high school students who competed in the Sea Lion Bowl, a challenging ocean sciences quiz event. The School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences hosted the regional competition.

Advancing earthquake and tsunami science: Tōhoku four years later

Four years after one of the largest earthquakes in recorded history devastated Japan, Stanford geophysicists Greg Beroza, Eric Dunham, and Paul Segall provide new insights that help clarify why previous assumptions about the fault had been so wrong.  Using new technologies, they explain what happened during the earthquake and tsunami, and discuss ongoing research that helps society better prepare for similar events in the future.

Animal functional diversity started out poor, became richer over time

New research by Jonathan Payne's lab refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an “early burst” of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.

shasta lake

Warming temperatures implicated in recent California droughts

In California, dry years coupled with warm conditions are more likely to lead to severe drought than dry, cool years, and the probability of warm and dry conditions coinciding is likely to increase under anthropogenic climate change. 

Ancient 'topsy-turvy' climate in western U.S. informs current climate models

Kate Maher and a team of scientists at Stanford and Vanderbilt Universities have created the first comprehensive map of the topsy-turvy climate of the western U.S. and are using it to test and improve the ability of global climate models to predict future precipitation patterns.

European grain yield stagnation related to climate change

After changes in government policy and farm practices, European grain yields leveled off. Stanford's Frances C. Moore says climate trends account for 10 percent of that stagnation.

Animals tend to evolve toward larger sizes over time

New Stanford research shows that animals tend to evolve toward larger body sizes over time. Over the past 542 million years, the mean size of marine animals has increased 150-fold.

Science communication as a “responsibility”

Noah Diffenbaugh says that because his research group is federally funded, he feels a responsibility to communicate about his work with the public. As a citizen, he also feels a responsibility about contributing to the public dialogue about climate change.

Climate change could expand double cropping in the U.S.

New research by a Stanford team shows that climate change is expanding the amount of U.S. agricultural land that is suitable for harvesting two crops per growing season, a system known as double cropping. The practice offers higher productivity and more income for American farmers, but future yield losses from climate change may still outstrip the gains from double cropping. 

Bold solutions for high seas marine conservation

Two-thirds of high seas fisheries are depleted or overfished, with impacts of climate change and marine pollution compounding the problem. Technology and political will can reverse the downward trend and move toward sustainability.

Major atmospheric river to soak NorCal later this week

As seems to have become the theme over the past few years, an intense precipitation event now appears likely to immediately follow an extraordinary dry spell across Northern California

Stanford scientists use ocean waves to monitor offshore oil and gas fields

New technique exploits naturally occurring seismic waves to probe seafloor at less expense, and with fewer ill effects on marine life.

Young leaders changing the West

Daniel Swain was selected as one of 10 people under 30 who are shaping the future of the American West.


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