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The structural geology and tectonics research group addresses topical problems in structural geology, regional geology and tectonics, and how rocks deform--at the atomic to the plate tectonic scale. The goals of our research are to contribute to our basic knowledge of deformation at the lithospheric scale, how deformation at depth is coupled to that at the surface, and to better understand the driving forces for this deformation.  We utilize a variety of approaches, both traditional and innovative.  Timing and the rates of deformational events based on geochronologic and thermochronologic data sets are key to our research. 

Faculty

Research Groups

We comprehensively examine the evolution of the Earth's crust using highly integrated geochronologic approaches conducted in a wide spectrum of analytical facilities that are all housed within the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. Our highly collaborative research provides fundamental data to many disciplines throughout the geosciences, including tectonics, geodynamics, petrology, geochemistry, geomorphology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, paleontology, and paleoclimatology.

The Stanford Center for Earth Resources Forecasting (SCERF) provides research in the exploration, evaluation & development of Earth Resources, whether Energy, Water or Minerals.

Our motivation

The Sedimentary Geology Research Group at Stanford University studies a variety of problems in basin analysis, deep-water systems, process sedimentology, micropaleontology, and Archean environmental conditions.

The structural geology and tectonics research group addresses topical problems in structural geology, regional geology and tectonics, and how rocks deform--at the atomic to the plate tectonic scale. The goals of our research are to contribute to our basic knowledge of deformation at the lithospheric scale, how deformation at depth is coupled to that at the surface, and to better understand the driving forces for this deformation. We utilize a variety of approaches, both traditional and innovative.

The tectonic geomorphology group focuses on understanding erosion by landslides, rivers, and biota, and uplift by faulting. The group's research combines detailed field studies, analytical and numerical models, laboratory measurements, and remote-sensing (space- and drone-based) observations to understand how and why landscapes change in different environments across our planet.   The fundamental understanding of these natural processes is used to improve assessments of risks, and develop workable strategies for reducing risk and increasing resilience.