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Geological Sciences Seminar: Emily Finzel, University of Iowa

Date and Time: 
November 19, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Admission: 

Free

Location: 
GeoCorner 220 - 450 Serra Mall, Building 320
Contact Email: 
kcwells7@stanford.edu
Contact Phone: 
650-723-0848
Event Sponsor: 
Department of Geological Science

** Please join us for coffee and cookies in the GeoCorner Undergraduate lounge (bldg. 320, rm 114) before the talk, at 11:30am! - Seminar will be in room 220~

Forearc basin detrital record of Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonics in the Northern Cordillera, southern Alaska

The Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic history of southern Alaska is complex and many aspects are still quite contentious.  As part of the mobile belt along western North America, the Middle Jurassic-Late Cretaceous timing of terrane accretion and translation of most of southern Alaska are still highly debated.  Evidence in the outboard parts of the accretionary complex in south-central Alaska suggest subduction of a spreading ridge during Paleocene-Eocene time, but due to this translation history its relationship with the inboard forearc regions remains uncertain.  Flat-slab subduction of an oceanic plateau characterizes the margin of south-central Alaska today, but the initial timing of slab flattening remains disputed.  Over the last decade, we have investigated the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic history of southern Alaska through detrital geochronologic, isotopic, and thermochronologic analyses of forearc basin strata. Overall, our studies have advanced our knowledge by providing new constraints on the Mesozoic paleogeography of western North America, as well as a foundation for new tectonic and provenance models of forearc basins that have been modified by flat-slab subduction processes. In addition, we have facilitated the relatively new use of U-Pb and fission track double-dating of detrital zircons to classify basins with enigmatic origins and tectonic histories.

Dr. Emily Finzel received her Ph.D. from Purdue University in basin analysis and tectonics.  After spending a few years in industry, she took a faculty position with the University of Iowa in 2012.  Dr. Finzel specializes in analyzing sediment dispersal and using various provenance techniques to solve tectonic problems.