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Research Profiles

These stories offer a glimpse of the many ways in which Geological & Environmental Sciences is changing the world:

Intrusive, Uplift and Erosional History of the Northern Sierra Nevada batholith

The Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith preserves an extensive record of continental-margin arc magmatism which serves as a classic, worldwide model for such tectonic environments.

Extreme Environments Laboratory

Launched with renovation and equipment support from the Chevron Corporation, Assistant Professor Wendy Mao's Extreme Environments Laboratory investigates the behavior of a wide range of materials under high pressure.

Under the Surface

In the summer of 2008, Professor Minik Rosing of the Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen, and his international team of scientists including Professor Dennis Bird of the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University went to Greenland to seek evidence for the Earliest life on Earth

Coupling between climate, erosional processes, and orogenesis

This project seeks to establish the potential role of climatically-moderated erosional processes in the development of the central Andean orogen. We have conducted field studies in central Argentina that document the relationship between uplift of the margin of the Puna Plateau and the establishment of internal drainage and fluvial network reintegration.

Dynamic Tensile Cracking During Earthquake Ruptures

PhD student Ashley Griffith, working with Professor David Pollard and colleagues, uses optical experiments and high-speed photography to interpret the origins of tensile, off-fault fractures which are often observed to form in damage zones of exhumed geological faults.

Lucia Chica Project

Images of the deep ocean floor obtained from ship-towed instruments are inherently limited in resolution. In contrast, self-propelled devices ‘flying’ at low altitudes above the seafloor reveal unprecedented details of submarine topography.