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These stories offer a glimpse of the many ways in which faculty and students are addressing some of today's greatest challenges in the Earth and environmental sciences.

Counting calories in the fossil record
03/25/2014 | Stanford School of Earth Sciences

Why did the ancestors of clams and oysters flourish after one of the worst mass extinctions in Earth’s history while another class of shelled creatures, the brachiopods, sharply decline? By using fossils to calculate the food intake of both groups, scientists are one step closer to solving one of paleontology’s great mysteries and providing clues about how the biology of our modern ocean evolved.

Increasing the role of science in energy policy
Stanford School of Earth Sciences

From nuclear waste to strategic minerals for renewable energy, Rod Ewing wants to inject more science into long-term solutions. The recipient of a PhD in geology from Stanford in 1974, Ewing returns to The Farm with joint appointments in the School of Earth Sciences and the Center for International Security and Cooperation.

Understanding how mountains and rivers make life possible
Kate Maher and Page Chamberlain have modeled how the topography and rock composition of a landscape affects the process by which carbon dioxide is transferred to oceans and eventually buried in Earth’s interior.

Kate Maher and Page Chamberlain have modeled how the topography and rock composition of a landscape affects the process by which carbon dioxide is transferred to oceans and eventually buried in Earth’s interior.

Abandoned mine holds clues to CO2 sequestration
Stanford News Service

Stanford scientists are studying a nearby abandoned mine for insights on transforming carbon dioxide gas into a solid mineral that can be permanently stored underground.

Precious rare earth metals discovered where continental plates collided
Precious rare earth metals discovered where continental plates collided

New finding indicates that rare earth elements used in technologies from smartphones to wind turbines may exist in previously unexplored locations where mountains were built by collisions rather than where continental plates separated. 

Stanford researchers probe mine for clues to carbon sequestration (video)
Stanford researchers probe mine for clues to carbon sequestration

Stanford scientists are studying a nearby abandoned mine for insights on transforming carbon dioxide gas into a solid mineral that can be permanently stored underground. Kate Maher talks about the research.

Distinguished Lecture Series
Distinguished Lecture Series

The Earth Sciences Distinguished Lecture Series presents "A Beautiful, Hazardous Haven: The Shaping of the Santa Cruz Mountains" by Prof. George Hilley

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:15PM
Huang Engineering Center - Mackenzie Room
Reception to follow

Two Stanford professors win MacArthur 'genius' awards
MacArthur Foundation

David Lobell was honored with a MacArthur Fellowship for research on the impact of climate change on crop production and food security. Kevin Boyce won his fellowship for establishing links between ancient plant remains and present-day ecosystems.

Jon Payne selected for undergraduate Faculty Scholars Program
Jon Payne selected for undergraduate Faculty Scholars Program

Pilot activity encourages six recently tenured faculty members to experiment in research and teaching

Josie Nevitt selected for the Harriet Benson Fellowship Award

Josie Nevitt received the 2012-13 Harriet Benson Fellowship Award for exceptional scholarship and research accomplishments by a graduate student in the Department of Geological & Environmental Sciences.  Josie is a 4th year PhD student working with Professor David Pollard.